Archive for May, 2011

“Soundw(e)ave” by Christy Matson

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

soundweave_installation1.jpgFrom The New Materiality by Nathaniel Stern, Furtherfield.org; a review of the exhibition The New Materiality: Digital Dialogues at the Boundaries of Contemporary Craft:

Soundw(e)ave, (Christy Matson’s) piece on show, is a self-referential textile, where the actual sounds of computerized Jacquard looms were used to create woven compositions. Her noisy sound waves were turned into three patterned pieces of fabric, made by hand-operated, computer-assisted and fully automated (Jacquard) looms, respectively – each weave growing progressively denser with the more advanced technologies used in their production. The piece, says Matson, was a huge turning point in her practice; it pointed her towards a kind of digital craftsmanship, where she was better able to place value on the ideas, materials and skillfulness needed to be an artisan across contemporary digital, craft and art domains. (more…)

Until The Next Revolution

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

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Net_Music_Weekly: Moori - Audience Participatory Performance

Friday, May 13th, 2011

moori.pngMoori: Audience Participatory Performance :: May 14, 2011; 9:00 pm + May 20, 2011; 7:00 pm :: Barkroom, Parsons, 2 W. 13th St. Ground Floor (corner of 5th Ave), New York, NY.

Moori, by Haeyoung Kim, is an interactive audience participatory audio-visual performance. By incorporating multiple modes of messaging on a mobile phone, users tell their stories to guided questions by the performer. User data is processed to generate algorithmic audio and visuals while creating a larger narrative. This collaboration creates dialog among the performer and audience members and suggests new possibilities that can exist through the combination of algorithmic animation, audio and language. (more…)

Calabi Portal Project RFQ

Monday, May 9th, 2011

Calabi Portal Projecta laboratory for ideas and the imagination :: Call for Proposals — No Deadline.

This competition is open to visionary designers, artists, architects, and scientists, and any collaborative combination. All designs will be theoretical. No background or experience in engineering, construction, or actual fabrication materials is required as the structure will be self-generating and assembling. The challenge is to conceive of the possibilities of an architectural visualization of 10 dimensional space incorporating the six dimensional Calabi-Yau manifold. The proposed structure is to take the form of what we loosely describe as a “Tower”, and is open to interpretation. It may also contain or emanate light and sound.

See website for more information. Sponsored by the Multiverse Research Institute.

Live Stage: Cassette Memories [Paris]

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

cassette_memories.jpgBirdcage sound gallery presents Aki Onda: Cassette Memories, curated by Daniele Balit :: May 14, 2011; 8:30 - 10:30 pm [Nuit des Musées (Museum Night)]:: Cour Carrée du Louvre, Paris.

Aki Onda is an electronic musician, composer, and visual artist. He was born in Japan and currently resides in New York. Onda is particularly known for his Cassette Memories project – works compiled from a “sound diary” of field-recordings collected by Onda over a span of two decades. Onda’s musical instrument of choice is the cassette Walkman. Not only does he capture field recordings with the Walkman, he also physically manipulates multiple Walkmans with electronics in his performances. (more…)

Vague Terrain 19: Schematic as Score

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

fabelphonetikum-schematic.pngVague Terrain 19: Schematic as Score; curated and edited by Derek Holzer: Over the past few years, a strong reaction against the sterile world of laptop sound and video has inspired a new interest in analog processes, and a fresh exploration of the pioneers of the electronic arts during the pre-digital era of the 1960s and 1970s. Artists and inventors such as Nam June Paik, Steina & Woody Vasulka, Don Buchla, Serge Tcherepnin, Dan Sandin and David Tudor all constructed their own unique instruments long before similar tools became commercially available or freely downloadable — through a long, rigorous process of self-education in electronics. John Cage once quipped that Tcherepnin’s synthesizer system was “the best musical composition that Serge had ever made”, and it is precisely Cage’s reformulation of the concert score from a list of deterministic note values to a set of indeterministic possibilities that allowed the blurring of lines between instrument-builder and music composer that followed. (more…)