HRRAAGHP-TING!

April 2006

Supported by The Greenwall Foundation

HRRAAGHP-TING! connects image and sound filenames on the web to create an infinite chain of associations. Extruded in real time, and in a linear format, it collapses the Internet’s spatial organization into a single screen to create a cinematic experience. Each time HRRAAGHP-TING! is used, it generates an entirely different set of visual, aural and linguistic relationships. This Cagean play with chance destabilizes the intent and authorship implicit in the communication of information; perverts intellectual property through rampant decontextualization; and defies the expectations of the viewer through live reorganization.

REQUIREMENTS

From 1996: For HRRAAGHP-TING! to run freely, please turn off all safe modes on your Google’s preferences. Scroll down and toggle the “Do not filter my search results” tab in the SafeSearch Filtering option. Make sure that have an updated version of Quicktime.

This piece no longer functions.

ADDITIONAL NOTES

From the website:

HRRAAGHP-TING! is an Internet/video collaboration between Olen Hsu, Dana Karwas and Steven Lam. Using programming developed to connect image filenames to sound filenames readily available on the web, the piece establishes an infinite chain of associations. This information is then extruded in real time, linking the data in a linear format where related and non-related files are turned into a series of stills and soundtracks.

HRRAAGHP-TING! converts the Internet into a cinematic experience by collapsing the internet’s spatial organization within a single screen. The relationship of one image or sound to the next is based on a randomized process achieved through an algorithmic construction. Each time HRRAAGHP-TING! is used, it generates an entirely different set of visual, aural and linguistic relationships. This Cagean play with chance destabilizes the intent and authorship implicit in the communication of information; perverts intellectual property through rampant decontextualization; and defies the expectations of the viewer through this live reorganization. Objects speak, portraits combust, landscapes squeal.

The user is betrayed and unsure how to organize the relationships between image, text and sound. At times the sound syncs with the image, heightening its drama and its capacity for affect, almost giving voice to the image. Other times, the image and sound do not correspond, leaving the viewer with little more than an articulated confusion punctuated with unpredictable moments of irony, empathy and distance.

“A [manufactured] table stands with its feet on the ground. But, in relation to all other commodities, it stands on its head, and evolves out of its wooden brain grotesque ideas, far more wonderful than table-turning ever was.” K. Marx, Capital.

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